My Items

I'm a title. ​Click here to edit me.

2022, here we come!!

2022, here we come!!

Find the Dutch text at the bottom of this blog! It is almost 2022 and it is time to look back on 2021. All in all, it was a great year with many events hosted during the Pint of Science festival and #pintNLthuis events. Multiple cities were represented by amazing speakers whom shared their diverse research. In addition, the blog was filled by interesting authors introducing us to their research. To make this year such a success, we would love to thank everyone that has participated in our events and blog! Without our audience, volunteers, and especially the participating scientists it wouldn’t have been possible. All that rests us now is to move into 2022, where we hope to have a live Pint of Science festival so we can all meet in person again. Follow our social media and blog to stay updated! For now, we would love to wish you an amazing 2022 and to organising #pint22! Gelukkig nieuwjaar, frohes neues Jahr, bonne année, sretna Nova godina, eftychisméno to néo étos, boldog új évet, athbhliain faoi mhaise duit, buon anno, godt nytt år, feliz Ano Novo, с новым годом, Feliz año nuevo, gott nytt år, happy new year, ສະບາຍດີປີໃຫມ່, สวัสดีปีใหม่, heri ya mwaka mpya, gelukkige Nuwe Jaar! Het is bijna 2022, dus het is tijd om terug te blikken op 2021. Al met al was het een geweldig jaar met veel evenementen tijdens het Pint of Science festival en #pintNLthuis. Meerdere steden werden vertegenwoordigd door geweldige sprekers die hun diverse onderzoek presenteerden. Daarnaast werd de blog gevuld met interessante auteurs die ons kennis lieten maken met hun onderzoek. Om dit jaar tot zo'n succes te maken, willen we graag iedereen bedanken die heeft deelgenomen aan onze evenementen en blog! Zonder ons publiek, vrijwilligers en vooral de deelnemende wetenschappers zou het niet mogelijk zijn geweest. Het enige dat ons nu rest, is om naar 2022 te verhuizen, waar we hopen een live Pint of Science Wetenschapsfestival te hebben zodat we elkaar allemaal weer persoonlijk kunnen ontmoeten. Volg onze sociale media en blog om op de hoogte te blijven! Voor nu wensen we je een geweldig 2022 en op het organiseren van #pint22!

Prejudice and children’s literature (EN)

Prejudice and children’s literature (EN)

Since the Black Lives Matter protests in 2020, more attention has been paid to racism and discrimination all over the world, including in the Netherlands. The subject is more often discussed at talk show tables, more is being written about it, and attention for the matter has increased in politics. Discrimination and racism can arise from prejudice. But what do children’s books have to do with this? Prejudice refers to opinions or assumptions about someone that are based on what group someone belongs to in your mind and that are not based on facts. When looking for ways to reduce racism and discrimination, an important question therefore is: how and when do people develop prejudice? Many scientists have formulated different theories about this how-question (see, for example, Levy & Hughes, 2009). The when-question is also being investigated more and more. Contrary to popular belief, children at a young age already show prejudice towards people who look different from them (Raabe & Beelmann, 2011). We also see this in children in the Netherlands. For example, in one of our studies we asked White children between 6 and 8 years old who they would (not) want to sit next to, who they would (not) want to play with, and who they would like to invite to their birthday party (de Bruijn et al., 2020). The participating children could in response choose from photos of other children of about the same age, but with different ethnic appearances. In response to positively formulated questions, the participating children more often chose a picture of a White child, than a picture of a Black child or a child with a Middle Eastern appearance. In response to the negatively formulated questions, they chose of a picture of a White child least often. An important theory about reducing prejudice is the intergroup contact theory. This theory proposes that having contact with people of a different ethnic group than your one (i.e., interethnic contact) reduces prejudice towards people from this ethnic group (Pettigrew & Tropp, 2006). This also seems to work among children (Tropp & Prenevost, 2008). However, it is not always self-evident that children from different ethnic groups engage in contact with each other. Nonetheless, indirect contact also appears to contribute to reducing prejudice. Indirect contact can occur in different forms, for example by seeing examples of interethnic contact in your environment (extended contact, Wright et al., 1997), or by getting acquainted with other backgrounds through different forms of media (parasocial contact, Schiappa, 2005). Indeed, that is where children’s books come in. Previous research in the United Kingdom has shown that children who read books in which characters from their own ethnic group were friends with characters from another ethnic group subsequently were less prejudiced against this other ethnicity (Cameron et al., 2006). Children’s books therefore offer an opportunity to indirectly introduce children to different cultures and ethnic backgrounds, and thereby reduce prejudice. But how diverse is the collection of children’s books? To get a good idea of books to which Dutch children are likely to be exposed, we examined the representation of characters of color in popular children’s books in the Netherlands (de Bruijn et al., 2021a). For this study, we selected books that were in top lists of books borrowed and sold most often, or that had won a prize, between 2009 and 2018. In this selection, we analyzed the ethnicity of all characters in the books that were aimed at children aged 6 or younger, and compared the ratio to statistics on the Dutch population from CBS. Results showed that characters of color were underrepresented in this selection of popular Dutch children’s books. Children of color in the Netherlands therefore have relatively fewer opportunities to read books about characters who look like them, and to find role models who look like them in books. In addition, there is a good chance that parents who do not specifically pay attention to diversity in children’s books unconsciously read their children few books with characters of color or ethnic diversity among the characters. This can result in White children gaining little experience with indirect interethnic contact and not learning a lot about other cultures through books. This can contribute to what children come to see as normal and the norm, thus fostering prejudice. In addition, subtle stereotypes that sometimes still appear in children’s books (de Bruijn et al., 2021b) can also have an effect, comparable to surreptitious advertising. As a parent, you likely have to deal with many factors that come into play when choosing a new book to read your child. For example, just think about things like language level, interests, and previous favorite books. Some parents might just be happy when they find a book that their child is excited about. However, it is also important to be aware of the message about diversity that the books convey. After all, the choice of children’s books can have an impact on the norms and the worldview that is imparted to children. Ymke de Bruijn University: Universiteit Leiden Institute: Leiden University College Favorite drink: Blond or Tripel beers Want to know more? Find more about Ymke de Bruijn and her research on these pages: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ymkedebruijn, Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ymkedebruijn/ University page: https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/medewerkers/ymke-de-bruijn Verwijzingen de Bruijn, Y., Amoureus, C., Emmen, R. A. G., & Mesman, J. (2020). Interethnic prejudice against Muslims among White Dutch children. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 51(3-4), 203-221. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022120908346 de Bruijn, Y., Emmen, R. A. G., & Mesman, J. (2021a). Ethnic diversity in children’s books in the Netherlands. Early Childhood Education Journal, 49,413-423. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-020-01080-2 de Bruijn, Y., Emmen, R.A.G., & Mesman, J. (2021b). What do we read to our children? Messages concerning ethnic diversity in popular children’s books in the Netherlands. SN Social Sciences, 1, 206. https://doi.org/10.1007/s43545-021-00221-7 Cameron, L., Rutland, A., Brown, R., & Douche, R. (2006). Changing children’s intergroup attitudes toward refugees: Testing different models of extended contact. Child Development, 77(5), 1208-1219. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00929.x Levy, S. R., & Hughes, J. M. (2009). Development of racial and ethnic prejudice among children. In T. Nelson (Ed.,), Handbook of Prejudice, Stereotyping, and Discrimination (p. 23-42). Psychology Press. Pettigrew, T.F., & Tropp, L.R. (2006). A meta-analytic test of intergroup contact theory. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90(5), 751-783. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.90.5.751 Raabe, T., & Beelmann, A. (2011). Development of ethnic, racial, and national prejudice in childhood and adolescence: A multinational meta-analysis of age differences. Child Development, 82, 1715–1737. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01668.x Schiappa, E., Gregg, P. B., & Hewes, D. E. (2005). The parasocial contact hypothesis. Communication Monographs, 72(1), 92-115. https://doi.org/10.1080/0363775052000342544 Tropp, L. R., & Prenovost, M. A. (2008). The role of intergroup contact in predicting children's interethnic attitudes: Evidence from meta-analytic and field studies. In S. R. Levy & M. Killen (Eds.), Intergroup attitudes and relations in childhood through adulthood (p. 236–248). Oxford University Press. Wright, S. C., Aron, A., McLaughlin-Volpe, T., & Ropp, S. A. (1997). The extended contact effect: Knowledge of cross-group friendships and prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 73-90.

Vooroordelen en kinderboeken (NL)

Vooroordelen en kinderboeken (NL)

Sinds de Black Lives Matter protesten in 2020 is er in de hele wereld, ook in Nederland, meer aandacht voor racisme en discriminatie. Het onderwerp wordt vaker besproken aan talkshow tafels, er wordt meer over geschreven, en ook in de politiek neemt de aandacht voor het onderwerp toe. Discriminatie en racisme kan voortkomen uit het hebben van vooroordelen. Maar wat hebben kinderboeken hiermee te maken? Vooroordelen zijn meningen of assumpties over iemand die je vormt op basis van tot welke groep iemand in je hoofd behoort en die niet op feiten gebaseerd zijn. Bij het zoeken naar oplossingen om racisme en discriminatie terug te dringen, is een belangrijke vraag dan ook: hoe en wanneer ontwikkelen mensen vooroordelen? Over deze hoe-vraag hebben tal van wetenschappers verschillende theorieën opgesteld (zie bijvoorbeeld Levy & Hughes, 2009). Ook de wanneer-vraag wordt steeds vaker onderzocht. Want in tegenstelling tot wat vaak gedacht wordt, hebben ook kinderen al op jonge leeftijd vooroordelen over mensen die er anders uitzien dan zij (Raabe & Beelmann, 2011). Ook bij kinderen in Nederland zien we dit terug. Zo vroegen wij in een onderzoek aan witte kinderen tussen de 6 en 8 jaar oud naast wie ze (niet) zouden willen zitten, met wie ze (niet) zouden willen spelen, en wie ze zouden willen uitnodigen voor hun kinderfeestje (de Bruijn et al., 2020). De deelnemende kinderen konden kiezen uit foto’s van andere kinderen van ongeveer dezelfde leeftijd, maar die een verschillend etnisch voorkomen hadden. De deelnemende kinderen kozen als antwoord op de positief geformuleerde vragen vaker voor een wit kind op de foto dan voor een zwart kind of een kind met een Midden-Oosters voorkomen. Als antwoord op de negatief geformuleerde vragen kozen ze juist het minst vaak voor een wit kind op de foto. Een belangrijke theorie over het verminderen van vooroordelen is de intergroup contact theory. Deze theorie stelt dat het hebben van contact met mensen met een andere etnische achtergrond dan jijzelf (interetnisch contact) vooroordelen over mensen met deze achtergrond vermindert (Pettigrew & Tropp, 2006). Ook onder kinderen lijkt dit te werken (Tropp & Prevonost, 2008), maar het is niet altijd vanzelfsprekend dat kinderen met verschillende etnische achtergronden met elkaar in contact (kunnen) komen. Ook indirect contact blijkt echter bij te kunnen dragen aan het verminderen van vooroordelen. Indirect contact kan in verschillende vormen voorkomen, bijvoorbeeld via het zien van voorbeelden van interetnisch contact in je omgeving (extended contact, Wright et al., 1997), of door het kennis maken met andere achtergronden in verschillende vormen van media (parasocial contact, Schiappa, 2005). Inderdaad, dat is waar de kinderboeken naar voren komen. Eerder onderzoek in het Verenigd Koninkrijk heeft namelijk laten zien dat kinderen die boeken lazen waarin personages met hun eigen etnische achtergrond bevriend waren met personages met een andere achtergrond daarna minder sterke vooroordelen hadden over deze andere achtergrond (Cameron et al., 2006). Kinderboeken bieden dan ook een toegankelijke mogelijkheid om kinderen indirect kennis te laten maken met verschillende culturen en etnische achtergronden, en daarmee ook nog eens vooroordelen te verminderen. Maar hoe divers is het aanbod in kinderboeken? Om een goed beeld te krijgen van boeken waarvan de kans groot is dat Nederlandse kinderen eraan worden blootgesteld hebben wij de representatie van personages van kleur in populaire kinderboeken in Nederland onderzocht (de Bruijn et al., 2021a). Voor dit onderzoek maakten we een selectie van boeken die tussen 2009 en 2018 in de toplijsten stonden van meest uitgeleende en verkochte boeken, of die een prijs hadden gewonnen. Binnen deze selectie hebben we de etniciteit van alle personages in de boeken die gericht waren op kinderen van 6 jaar of jonger geanalyseerd, en de verhouding vergeleken met cijfers over de Nederlandse bevolking van het CBS. Hieruit bleek dat in deze selectie van populaire Nederlandse jeugdboeken personages van kleur ondervertegenwoordigd waren. Kinderen van kleur in Nederland hebben daarom relatief minder mogelijkheden om boeken te lezen over personages die op hun lijken en om rolmodellen die op hun lijken te vinden in boeken. Daarnaast is de kans groot dat ouders die hier niet specifiek op letten onbewust weinig kinderboeken met etnische diversiteit voorlezen aan hun kinderen, waardoor witte kinderen weinig ervaring op doen met indirect interetnisch contact en weinig leren over andere culturen via boeken. Dit kan bijdragen aan wat kinderen als normaal en de norm gaan zien, en op die manier vooroordelen in de hand werken. Ook subtiele stereotypen die soms nog in kinderboeken voorkomen (de Bruijn et al., 2021b) kunnen effect hebben, vergelijkbaar met sluikreclame. Als ouder heb je te maken met veel factoren die meespelen bij het uitkiezen van een nieuw voorleesboek. Denk bijvoorbeeld alleen al aan het taalniveau en de interesses van je kind, en aan eerdere favoriete boeken. Sommige ouders zijn misschien allang blij als er een boek gevonden is waar hun kind enthousiast van wordt. Toch is het ook belangrijk om je bewust te zijn van de boodschap over diversiteit die het boekenaanbod overbrengt. De keuze voor boeken kan immers een impact hebben op de normen en het wereldbeeld dat aan kinderen wordt meegeven. Ymke de Bruijn Universiteit: Universiteit Leiden Afdeling: Leiden University College Favoriete drankje: Zwaar Blond of Tripel biertjes Volg Ymke de Bruijn en haar onderzoek middels de onderstaande links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ymkedebruijn, Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ymkedebruijn/ Medewerkerspagina universiteit Leiden: https://www.universiteitleiden.nl/medewerkers/ymke-de-bruijn Verwijzingen de Bruijn, Y., Amoureus, C., Emmen, R. A. G., & Mesman, J. (2020). Interethnic prejudice against Muslims among White Dutch children. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 51(3-4), 203-221. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022120908346 de Bruijn, Y., Emmen, R. A. G., & Mesman, J. (2021a). Ethnic diversity in children’s books in the Netherlands. Early Childhood Education Journal, 49,413-423. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10643-020-01080-2 de Bruijn, Y., Emmen, R.A.G., & Mesman, J. (2021b). What do we read to our children? Messages concerning ethnic diversity in popular children’s books in the Netherlands. SN Social Sciences, 1, 206. https://doi.org/10.1007/s43545-021-00221-7 Cameron, L., Rutland, A., Brown, R., & Douche, R. (2006). Changing children’s intergroup attitudes toward refugees: Testing different models of extended contact. Child Development, 77(5), 1208-1219. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2006.00929.x Levy, S. R., & Hughes, J. M. (2009). Development of racial and ethnic prejudice among children. In T. Nelson (Ed.,), Handbook of Prejudice, Stereotyping, and Discrimination (p. 23-42). Psychology Press. Pettigrew, T.F., & Tropp, L.R. (2006). A meta-analytic test of intergroup contact theory. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90(5), 751-783. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.90.5.751 Raabe, T., & Beelmann, A. (2011). Development of ethnic, racial, and national prejudice in childhood and adolescence: A multinational meta-analysis of age differences. Child Development, 82, 1715–1737. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01668.x Schiappa, E., Gregg, P. B., & Hewes, D. E. (2005). The parasocial contact hypothesis. Communication Monographs, 72(1), 92-115. https://doi.org/10.1080/0363775052000342544 Tropp, L. R., & Prenovost, M. A. (2008). The role of intergroup contact in predicting children's interethnic attitudes: Evidence from meta-analytic and field studies. In S. R. Levy & M. Killen (Eds.), Intergroup attitudes and relations in childhood through adulthood (p. 236–248). Oxford University Press. Wright, S. C., Aron, A., McLaughlin-Volpe, T., & Ropp, S. A. (1997). The extended contact effect: Knowledge of cross-group friendships and prejudice. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 73(1), 73-90.

Wie wint schrijft geschiedenis, maar klopt deze wel? Interview een Wetenschapper: Uzume Zoë Wijnsma

Wie wint schrijft geschiedenis, maar klopt deze wel? Interview een Wetenschapper: Uzume Zoë Wijnsma

Wat is jouw naam? Uzume Zoë Wijnsma Waar doe je op dit moment jouw onderzoek?
Ik werk momenteel voor de Universiteit Leiden, binnen het Leiden Institute for Area Studies (LIAS). In augustus zet ik mijn werk voort aan de Ludwig Maximilans-Universiteit van München. Wat is het onderwerp van jouw onderzoek? Mijn onderzoek is gericht op het Perzische Rijk (ca. 550 – 330 v.C.). In de 6e tot en met de 4e eeuw v.C. besloeg het Perzische Rijk een enorm gedeelte van west Azië en het oosten van het Middellandse Zeegebied. Op het hoogtepunt strekten de grenzen van Macedonië tot en met Afghanistan, en van Sudan tot en met Georgië. Het wordt ook wel het eerste “wereldrijk” in de geschiedenis genoemd. Binnen dit Rijk ben ik vooral geïnteresseerd in de regio’s van Egypte en Babylonië (hedendaags zuid Irak), en specifiek in de Egyptische en Babylonische opstanden die tegen de Perzen gevochten werden. Hoe ben je geïnteresseerd geraakt in dit onderwerp? Mijn interesse in het Perzische Rijk is op de middelbare school begonnen. Op het gymnasium lazen we namelijk Griekse teksten uit de 5e en 4e eeuw v.C., de tijd van het klassieke Athene. Denk aan Herodotus, die bekend staat als de eerste historicus uit de geschiedenis, of aan de filosofen Plato en Aristoteles. Een aantal van deze auteurs noemen de Perzen en hun gigantische rijk. De Perzen waren immers een grote bedreiging voor de Grieken, die met moeite hun onafhankelijkheid van het Perzische Rijk wisten te behouden. Tijdens mijn studie Oude Culturen van de Mediterrane Wereld in Leiden heb ik mijn interesse in de Perzen verder ontwikkeld. Ik wilde graag weten wat we over de Perzen wisten op basis van niet-Griekse bronnen, en hoe het Perzische Rijk ervaren werd door mensen die daadwerkelijk binnen Perzische grenzen leefden. Zou je iets meer kunnen vertellen over de opstanden die in Perzisch Egypte en Irak plaats hebben gevonden? De eerste opstanden ontstonden in ca. 522 v.C., toen er een troonopvolgingscrisis was in Iran. De Perzische koning, Cambyses, was gestorven, zijn broer werd vermoord, en een man die slechts in de verte verwant was aan het koningshuis, Darius I, claimde de troon. Tijdens deze politieke chaos braken er opstanden uit in verschillende delen van het rijk, waaronder in Egypte en Babylonië. De opstanden werden uiteindelijk neergeslagen door de legers van Darius I. Na de crisis van 522 v.C. kwam Babylonië nog tweemaal in opstand, en Egypte ca. vier keer. Het doel was telkens onafhankelijkheid van het Perzische Rijk te verkrijgen, en weer te leven onder een lokale vorst. Wat de exacte redenen achter de opstanden waren is lastig te achterhalen. Een aantal veranderingen die de Perzen in de Egyptische en Babylonische samenleving hadden doorgevoerd, hebben echter ongetwijfeld een rol gespeeld. Ten eerste moesten beide landen – net als andere provincies in het Perzische Rijk – grote hoeveelheden tribuut en belasting betalen aan de Perzische regering. Ten tweede werden de hoogste posten in het leger en civiele bestuur veelal door Perzen bezet; de macht van Egyptische en Babylonische beambten werd beperkter. Ten derde kwam er meer aandacht voor feesten, rituelen en monumentale bouw in Iran – het centrum van het Perzische Rijk – terwijl zulke zaken in Egypte en Babylonië in toenemende mate marginaal werden. Dit laatste element ging hand in hand met deportaties, waarbij grote groepen Egyptische en Babylonische arbeiders in Iran aan het werk werden gezet. Het is belangrijk om te noemen dat de opstanden deze situatie mogelijk hebben verergerd. De meeste opstanden werden namelijk neergeslagen door Perzische legers, waarna er repercussies volgden. Opstandelingen werden geëxecuteerd, gebouwen werden vernield, en lokale beambten die verdacht werden van deelname konden uit hun posten worden gezet. Er is slechts één opstand die succesvol is geweest: in ca. 400 v.C., meer dan een eeuw na de Perzische veroveringen, wist Egypte onafhankelijk te worden van het Perzische Rijk. Een aantal decennia daarna veroverden de Perzen de provincie weer terug. Hoe onderzoek je dit? Wanneer je het Perzische Rijk bestudeert, staan er tal van bronnen tot je beschikking. Eén bronnengroep heb ik al genoemd: de Griekse teksten uit de 5e en 4e eeuw v.C. Andere bronnen zijn het Oude Testament (ook daar wordt het Perzische Rijk genoemd), en natuurlijk alles wat er in de afgelopen eeuwen is opgegraven in het voormalig Perzische gebied. Denk aan inscripties op paleismuren in zuidwest Iran, kleitabletten in Irak, papyri in Egypte, beschreven potscherven in Israël, en graven in Turkije. Voor mijn onderzoek naar de Egyptische en Babylonische opstanden zijn vooral de Griekse teksten, de Perzische koningsinscripties, en de bronnen die zijn opgegraven in Egypte en Irak belangrijk. Daarbij gebruik ik vooral bronnen die gepubliceerd zijn. Om deze te consulteren moet ik naar de bibliotheek, en stoffige boeken openslaan (hoewel er, gelukkig, steeds meer online wordt gezet). Ik ben echter ook wel ‘ns op bronnen gestuit die nog niet gepubliceerd zijn, maar wel relevant bleken voor mijn onderzoek. Denk bijvoorbeeld aan een spijkerschrifttablet in een Europees museum, of een rotsinscriptie in de woestijn van Egypte. Op zulke momenten kwam mijn kennis van hiërogliefen en spijkerschrift goed van pas – dan moet je namelijk zelf met vertalen aan de slag! Vaak zijn dat de leukste momenten. Wat is het meest verassende/opmerkelijke wat je hebt ontdekt? Onder historici van het Perzische Rijk zijn de opstanden in Babylonië goed bekend. Dit komt grotendeels door de enorme hoeveelheid bronnen die daar zijn opgegraven: we hebben duizenden Babylonische teksten tot onze beschikking, waarvan een deel aan de opstanden te linken valt. Zo weten we welke regio’s van Babylonië in opstand kwamen, welke lagen van de bevolking er het meest mee te maken hadden, en hoe lang de opstanden duurden. Bij de Egyptische opstanden ligt de situatie anders. De meeste van deze opstanden worden genoemd door Griekse historici, wiens betrouwbaarheid in twijfel is getrokken. Egyptische bronnen die aan de opstanden gelinkt kunnen worden zijn er relatief weinig. Het resultaat is dat de Egyptische opstanden soms gebagatelliseerd zijn geweest: ze zouden niet zo lang geduurd hebben als dat Griekse historici claimen, en ze zouden slechts een klein gedeelte van Egypte beïnvloed hebben. Mijn onderzoek heeft echter het tegenovergestelde uitgewezen. Als we de Egyptische bronnen grondig bestuderen, wordt het duidelijk dat de meeste opstanden een aantal jaar hebben geduurd (vs. een paar maanden in Babylonië), en dat ze op grote delen van Egypte een impact hebben gehad. Deze conclusie verandert uiteraard ons begrip van Perzisch Egypte. Wat kunnen we leren van deze geschiedenis? Het Perzische Rijk is een belangrijke periode geweest in de geschiedenis van de mensheid. Met haar enorme omvang is het Rijk bijvoorbeeld een cruciaal onderdeel geweest in de globalisering van de wereld: nog nooit werden zoveel mensen verenigd onder één staat. Grootschalige migratie – zowel vrijwillig als gedwongen – zorgde voor toenemende interactie tussen etnische groepen, en vergemakkelijkte het uitwisselen van kennis, ideeën en verhalen. Met mijn onderzoek hoop ik bij te dragen aan een beter begrip van de ontstaansgeschiedenis en het functioneren van dit wereldrijk. Hoe kwam het dat de Perzen zo’n groot gebied wisten te veroveren, terwijl vorige staten dat niet gelukt was? En hoe wisten ze dit twee eeuwen lang bij elkaar te houden? Waar kunnen we meer vinden over jouw onderzoek? Mijn promotieonderzoek is deel van een groter project in Leiden, genaamd Persia and Babylonia. Op de website van het project (http://persiababylonia.org) valt van alles te vinden, zoals lezingen, blogs, en publicaties van mij en mijn collega’s. Daarnaast schrijf ik van tijd tot tijd een blog over mijn onderzoek voor Faces of Science, een project van Nemo kennislink en de Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen (https://www.nemokennislink.nl/facesofscience/wetenschappers/uzume-zoe-wijnsma/). Ben je geïnteresseerd in de oudheid, en op zoek naar toegankelijke informatie? Neem dan vooral een kijkje! Wat is jouw favoriete bier/drankje Dat wisselt per seizoen - maar op het moment ben ik gek op Ginger Beer. Overigens is dat ook het enige soort bier waar ik geen nee op zeg (ik ben altijd meer een wijn persoon geweest).

Who wins writes history, but is it true? Interview a scientist: Uzume Zoë Wijnsma

Who wins writes history, but is it true? Interview a scientist: Uzume Zoë Wijnsma

What is your name? Uzume Zoë Wijnsma Where are you currently doing your research? I am currently working for Leiden University, within the Leiden Institute for Area Studies (LIAS). In August I will continue my work at the Ludwig Maximilans University of Munich. What is the topic of your research? My research focuses on the Persian Empire (ca. 550 - 330 BC). In the 6th to 4th centuries B.C., the Persian Empire covered a large portion of western Asia and the eastern Mediterranean. At its height, its borders stretched from Macedonia to Afghanistan, and from Sudan to Georgia. It is also known as the first "world empire" in history. Within this Empire, I am particularly interested in the regions of Egypt and Babylonia (present-day southern Iraq), specifically in the Egyptian and Babylonian rebellions fought against the Persians. How did you become interested in this topic? My interest in the Persian Empire began in high school. In fact, in grammar school we read Greek texts from the 5th and 4th centuries BC, the time of classical Athens. Think of Herodotus, who is known as the first historian in history, or the philosophers Plato and Aristotle. Some of these authors mention the Persians and their gigantic empire. Indeed, the Persians were a great threat to the Greeks, who struggled to maintain their independence from the Persian Empire. While studying Ancient Cultures of the Mediterranean World in Leiden, I further developed my interest in the Persians. I wanted to know what we knew about the Persians based on non-Greek sources, and how the Persian Empire was experienced by people who actually lived within Persian borders. Could you tell a little more about the rebellions that took place in Persian Egypt and Iraq? The first uprisings occurred in about 522 B.C. when there was a succession crisis in Iran. The Persian king, Cambyses, had died, his brother was assassinated, and a man only remotely related to the royal family, Darius I, claimed the throne. During this political chaos, rebellions broke out in various parts of the empire, including Egypt and Babylonia. The rebellions were eventually put down by the armies of Darius I. After the crisis of 522 B.C. Babylonia rebelled twice more and Egypt about four more times. The goal each time was to gain independence from the Persian Empire and to live under a local ruler. What the exact reasons were behind the revolts are difficult to determine. However, a number of changes that the Persians made in Egyptian and Babylonian society undoubtedly played a role. First, both countries - like other provinces in the Persian Empire - had to pay large amounts of tribute and taxes to the Persian government. Second, the highest posts in the army and civil administration were mostly held by Persians; the power of Egyptian and Babylonian officials became more limited. Third, more attention was paid to festivals, rituals, and monumental construction in Iran-the center of the Persian Empire-while such matters became increasingly marginal in Egypt and Babylonia. The latter element went hand-in-hand with deportations, by which large groups of Egyptians and Babylonians were put to work in Iran. It is important to mention that the uprisings may have exacerbated this situation. In fact, most rebellions were put down by Persian armies, after which repercussions followed. Insurgents were executed, buildings were destroyed, and local officials suspected of participating could be removed from their posts. Only one rebellion was successful. In roughly 400 B.C., more than a century after the Persian conquests, Egypt managed to gain independence from the Persian Empire. However, a few decades after independence, the Persians recaptured the province. How do you research this? When you study the Persian Empire, there are numerous sources at your disposal. One source group I have already mentioned: the Greek texts from the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. Other sources are the Old Testament (the Persian Empire is also mentioned there), and, of course, everything that has been excavated in the former Persian area in recent centuries. Think of inscriptions on palace walls in southwest Iran, clay tablets in Iraq, papyri in Egypt, inscribed potsherds in Israel, and tombs in Turkey. For my research on the Egyptian and Babylonian revolts, Greek texts, Persian royal inscriptions and sources excavated in Egypt and Iraq are especially important. In doing so, I primarily use sources that have been published. To consult these I have to go to the library, and open dusty books (although, thankfully, more and more are being put online). However, I have also on occasion stumbled upon sources that are unpublished, but proved relevant to my research. Think of a cuneiform tablet in a European museum, or a rock inscription in the desert of Egypt. At times like that, my knowledge of hieroglyphs and cuneiform came in handy - that's when you have to start translating! Those are often the most enjoyable moments. What is the most surprising/noteworthy thing you discovered? Among historians of the Persian Empire, the rebellions in Babylonia are well known. This is largely due to the enormous amount of sources excavated there: we have thousands of Babylonian texts at our disposal, some of which can be linked to the uprisings. Thus we know which regions of Babylonia revolted, which layers of the population were most involved, and how long the revolts lasted. With the Egyptian rebellions, the situation is different. Most of these revolts are mentioned by Greek historians, whose reliability has been questioned. Egyptian sources that can be linked to the uprisings are relatively few. The result is that the Egyptian uprisings have sometimes been trivialized: they would not have lasted as long as Greek historians claim, and they would have affected only a small part of Egypt. My research, however, has shown the opposite. When we study the Egyptian sources in depth, it becomes clear that most of the revolts lasted several years (vs. a few months in Babylonia), and that they had an impact on large parts of Egypt. This conclusion obviously changes our understanding of Persian Egypt. What can we learn from this history? The Persian Empire was an important period in human history. For example, with its enormous size, the Empire was a crucial part in the globalization of the world. Never before had so many people been united under one state. Large-scale migration - both voluntary and forced - increased interaction between ethnic groups, and facilitated the exchange of knowledge, ideas and stories. With my research I hope to contribute to a better understanding of the genesis and functioning of this global empire. How was it that the Persians managed to conquer such a large area, while previous states had failed to do so? And how did they manage to hold it together for two centuries? Where can we find more about your research? My PhD research is part of a larger project in Leiden called Persia and Babylonia. On the website of the project (http://persiababylonia.org) you can find a lot of information, such as lectures, blogs, and publications from me and my colleagues. I also write a blog from time to time about my research for Faces of Science, a project of Nemo kennislink and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (https://www.nemokennislink.nl/facesofscience/wetenschappers/uzume-zoe-wijnsma/). Are you interested in antiquity and looking for accessible information? Then take a look! What is your favorite beer/drink? It varies with the season - but at the moment I love Ginger Beer. Incidentally, that's also the only kind of beer I don't say no to (I've always been more of a wine person).

Pielen met pollen: bestuivergemeenschappen op dijken

Pielen met pollen: bestuivergemeenschappen op dijken

Met een mengeling van verdriet en walging druk ik mijn mobielscherm op zwart. Het artikel betrof een insensitieve hork, een maaimachine en een zeldzame Bokkenorchis op een dijk in Zeeland. Zoals u begrijpt trok de laatste aan het kortste eind. De hork kon dat niet zoveel schelen. De moed zakte mij weer in de schoenen. Het went nooit als de zoveelste, zonder blikken of blozen, stelt dat het hem/haar geen zier kan schelen dat zeldzame flora/fauna lokaal is uitgeroeid. Een reactie als deze is wel heel extreem en verdient misschien wel geen aandacht. Maar feit blijft wel dat we de natuur vaak maar als iets lastigs zien. Tuinen moeten zo strak mogelijk (of helemaal van steen) en onze bermen blijven we ‘netjes’ plat maaien. Op de bloemperken vol met exoten na dan. Daarnaast spuiten we liters gif de grond en lucht in. Alles om de natuur maar zo ver mogelijk weg te houden. Het mocht dan misschien ook niet als een verrassing komen toen bleek dat we ~75% van al onze insecten zijn kwijtgeraakt over de laatste decennia1. Toch was de schrik enorm. Een ongekend probleem
Dan zit je met een probleem waarvan we de gevolgen slecht kunnen voorspellen. We hebben immers geen voorbeelden van een dergelijke drastische verandering. Wat we wel begrijpen is dat het foute boel is. Insecten vervullen talbare functies in ecosystemen en bewaren op die manier de balans in de natuur: rovers eten plaaginsecten, planteneters zorgen ervoor dat bepaalde planten niet te dominant worden en bestuivers zorgen ervoor dat bloemen voortbestaan. Daarbij zijn ze ook nog eens een fantastische voedselbron voor vele andere dieren, zoals vogels. Tevens zijn ze voor ons mensen belangrijk. Zonder insecten geen appel of peer. Daarbij moet ik bij het verdwijnen van soorten altijd denken aan een zin van zoöloog Mark Carwardine die ik ooit las; ‘There is one last reason [to preserve animals] ... And it is simply this: the world would be a poorer, darker and lonelier place without them’. Vertaling: ‘er is nog een andere reden om dieren te beschermen ... en dat is simpelweg dat de wereld een verarmde, donkerdere en eenzamere plek zou zijn zonder ze.’ Hoe kunnen we insecten dan helpen? Flower power
Het meest gebruikt is de lokale vegetatie ‘verbeteren’ om zo insecten voedsel te bieden. U bent vast bekend met de fameuze bloemstroken in landbouwgebied. Maar ook middels beheer van bermen, natuurontwikkeling en allerlei andere veranderingen aan de vegetatie proberen we onze insecten te helpen. Vaak werkt dat goed, soms ook niet. ‘Goed’ komt zelf weer voor in verschillende gradaties. Langzamerhand moeten we dus toegeven dat we nog niet goed begrijpen wanneer en hoe we door het veranderen van de vegetatie insecten het beste kunnen helpen. In mijn onderzoek kijk ik naar bestuivergemeenschappen op dijken. Dijken en wegbermen zijn namelijk interessante objecten in het kader van insectenbescherming. Het zijn vaak ongebruikte stukken grond waar we dus met relatief weinig moeite veel goed kunnen doen voor insecten. Dit hebben we gezien op dijken rondom Nijmegen, waar zeker meer dan 100 soorten bijen voorkomen2 (Dat is bijna eenderde van alle Nederlandse soorten)! Daarnaast vormen dijken en bermen een soort ‘haarvatennetwerk’ door het land. Zo verbinden ze veel natuurgebieden met elkaar. Een mooie bloemrijke dijk kan dus een habitat op zichzelf zijn voor insecten, maar ook een soort insectensnelweg! Pielen met pollen
Tenminste, dat is de theorie. Nu de praktijk. Met mijn onderzoek probeer ik allereerst vast te stellen welke soorten er voorkomen op dijken, wat dat betekent (zijn deze zeldzaam, specialist of alledaags) en tot slot wat verklaart of soorten wel of niet voorkomen. Dit doe ik door gedurende meerdere jaren bestuivers te monitoren (= tellen). Dat monitoren is misschien wel precies wat je je nu voorstelt: men neme een net, een stopwatch, een paar geitewollen sokken en afritsbroek (voor een goede ecologen look) en 150m dijk. Druk op start en vangen maar, na 15 minuten ben je klaar. Vervolgens weet ik dus welke soorten er voorkomen en waar deze soorten voorkomen. Eerder vermelde ik al dat we op deze manier meer dan 100 soorten bijen hebben vastgesteld. Daaronder waren ook meer dan 15 rode lijst soorten (soorten op de rode lijst zijn bedreigde soorten)! En dan komt het moeilijke, maar zeer belangrijke deel: wat bepaalt nu welke bijen waar zitten? Hiervoor kijk ik naar de structuur van bestuivergemeenschappen op dijken en naar de rol die vegetatie speelt in de vorming van deze gemeenschappen. Hierbij verwacht ik dat ‘niches’ een belangrijke rol spelen; iedere soort heeft zijn eigen favoriete voedsel, nestplaats etc. (= zijn niche) en soorten kunnen alleen samen voorkomen als ze hun eigen niche kunnen vinden en niet weg geconcureerd worden door een andere soort. Ik denk dat voedselbronnen voor bestuivers een erg belangrijk onderdeel van hun niche zijn en daarmee dat de samenstelling van bloemen voor een groot deel bepaalt welke soorten bestuivers samen voor kunnen komen. Dat kan op twee manieren: 1) als je meer soorten bloemen hebt zullen meer bijen hun favoriete voedselbron kunnen vinden; en 2) het kan zijn dat bepaalde bloemsoorten simpelweg voedsel bieden aan heel veel soorten tegelijk en daarom onmisbaar zijn. Ik bestudeer dit door te kijken naar de pollen die bijen bij zich dragen. Met DNA analyse kan ik precies zien vanaf welke bloemen bijen pollen hebben verzameld, en hoeveel van iedere soort. Zo kan ik bepalen of verschillende soorten bijen elkaar inderdaad ontwijken en ook zien of er bepaalde pollen zijn die door veel bijen verzameld worden. Een blik op de toekomst
Zolang we niet weten welke factoren belangrijk zijn in de vorming van bestuivergemeenschappen, dan kunnen we ze onmogelijk op een gerichte manier beschermen. De kennis die wij nu opdoen is dus essentieel om in de toekomst bestuivers efficiënt te kunnen beschermen. Doordat we weten welke soorten planten nodig zijn om bepaalde groepen/soorten insecten te helpen, kunnen we vegetatie beter ‘verbeteren’ om optimaal bestuiverhabitat te bieden aan zoveel mogelijk soorten. Dan hoeven we daarna alleen nog maar de mindset te veranderen van mensen die geloven dat het uitsterven van soorten niet zo’n groot probleem is...! 1. Hallmann, C. A. et al. More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas. PLoS One 12, e0185809 (2017). 2. Swinkels, C., Liebrand, C., van Rooijen, N., Visser, E. & De Kroon, H. De dijk als habitat voor bloemen en wilde bijen. Levende Nat. 3, 96–101 (2020). Constant Swinkels Universiteit: Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen
Department: Plant Ecology
Favoriete drank: afhankelijk van de situatie. Wijn en eten combineren is een hobby van me. Echter, in de kroeg drink ik met veel plezier een pint! Wil je meer weten? Kijk op www.constantswinkels.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/constant-swinkels-8791121b4/, https://www.nemokennislink.nl/facesofscience/wetenschappers/constant-swinkels/, en https://www.ru.nl/science/plant/people/group/constant-swinkels/

The pollen reveal: pollinator communities on dikes

The pollen reveal: pollinator communities on dikes

With a mixture of sadness and disgust, I press my cell phone screen to black. The article concerned an insensitive slob, a mower and a rare Lizard Orchid on a dike in Zeeland. As you can understand, the latter drew the short straw. The slob didn't really care. My heart sank into my boots again. You never get used to the umpteenth person stating, without blinking an eye, that he/she doesn't give a damn that rare flora/fauna has been locally eradicated. A reaction like this is quite extreme and perhaps does not deserve attention. But the fact remains that we often see nature as something inconvenient. Gardens should be as neat as possible (or made entirely of stone) and road verges 'neatly' mown. Except for the flowerbeds full of exotic species, that is. In addition, we spray litres of poison into the soil and air. Everything to keep nature as far away as possible. As such, it may not come as a surprise when it turned out that we have lost ~75% of all our insects over the last decades [1]. Still, the shock was enormous. An unprecedented problem
Then you're stuck with a problem of which the consequences are hard to predict. After all, we have no examples of such a drastic change. What we do understand is that it is bad. Insects fulfil numerous functions in ecosystems and preserve the balance in nature: predators eat insect pests, herbivores ensure that certain plants do not become too dominant and pollinators ensure the survival of flowers. And they are also a fantastic source of food for many other animals, such as birds. Besides their role in ecosystems, their importance for us humans can’t be underestimated. Without insects, there are no apples or pears. And if you’re not convinced already that we should protect our insects, I leave you with a sentence of zoologist Mark Carwardine that I always think of: ‘There is one last reason [to preserve animals] ... And it is simply this: the world would be a poorer, darker and lonelier place without them'. So how can we help insects? Flower power
The most common way is by "enhancing" the local vegetation to provide food for insects. You are probably familiar with the famous flower strips in agricultural areas. But also by managing roadsides, nature development and all kinds of other changes to the vegetation we try to help our insects. Often this works well, sometimes not. But also ‘working well’ comes in different gradations. So gradually we have to admit that we do not yet understand when and how we can best help insects by changing the vegetation. In my research I look at pollinator communities on dikes. Dikes (and road verges) are interesting objects in the context of insect protection. They are often unused pieces of land where we can do a lot of good for insects with relatively little effort. We have seen this on dikes around Nijmegen, where over 100 species of bees habit [2] (almost a third of all Dutch species)! In addition, dikes and verges form a kind of 'capillary network' through the country. In this way, they connect many nature areas with each other. A beautiful flowery dike can therefore be a habitat in itself for insects, but also a kind of insect highway! The pollen reveal
At least, that’s the theory. Now in practice. In my research I determine what species diversity we can find on dikes, what this means (are these rare or common species) and finally what determines patterns in their occurrence. I do this by monitoring bee populations on dikes for multiple years. This monitoring is a complex procedure that requires precise timing (a stopwatch), sharp vision, fitness (to walk 150m), the right outfit (you do want to look like an ecologist after all) and finally a piece of high-tech equipment (sometimes called a ‘butterfly net’). Yes, I run around with a butterfly net catching bees and that’s called research. By doing so, I eventually know exactly what bees occur where. As such we’ve already identified over 100 species, among which over 15 red listed (threatened) bee species! Then the hard and most important part - what determines where bees can thrive? To figure this out, I look at the structure of pollinator communities on dikes and the role that vegetation plays in the formation of these communities. My hypothesis is that ‘niche-based processes’ are crucial; each species has its own preferred food source, nesting place etc. (= its niche) and multiple species can only co-occur when they can all realise their own niche without getting outcompeted. I expect that food sources (flowers), through this idea of niches and competition, determine to a large extent what pollinator species can live together. This can happen in two ways: 1) a higher diversity of flowers provides more preferred food sources for more different bees, thus allowing more species to live together; and 2) there could also be flower species that simply provide food to a great number of species that can as such not be missed. To study how this mechanism works, I collect pollen from the bees and use DNA analysis to exactly determine what flower species the individual bees have collected pollen from and how much of each species. This allows me to determine whether different species indeed use different food sources (to avoid each other) and to see whether there are certain flower species of which the pollen are very commonly collected. This information is highly valuable for nature conservation. A look at the future
If we don’t understand by what factors pollinator communities are shaped, we cannot possibly protect them in a targeted way. The knowledge we are currently gaining is therefore crucial to protect pollinators effectively in the future. By knowing which types of plants are needed to help certain groups of pollinators, we can better plan how to ‘enhance’ vegetation (e.g. flower strips) to optimally provide pollinator habitat. Then all that is left to do is to change the mindset of those that believe species extinction is not a big deal… 1. Hallmann, C. A. et al. More than 75 percent decline over 27 years in total flying insect biomass in protected areas. PLoS One 12, e0185809 (2017). 2. Swinkels, C., Liebrand, C., van Rooijen, N., Visser, E. & De Kroon, H. De dijk als habitat voor bloemen en wilde bijen. Levende Nat. 3, 96–101 (2020). Constant Swinkels University: Radboud University Nijmegen
Department: Plant Ecology
Favourite beverage: depends on the situation. Pairing food and wine is a hobby of mine. However, in the bar I would gladly have a pint! For more information visit www.constantswinkels.com, https://www.linkedin.com/in/constant-swinkels-8791121b4/, or https://www.ru.nl/science/plant/people/group/constant-swinkels/

Recapping #pint21 online

Recapping #pint21 online

While the vaccines have helped shape the horizon of the COVID19 pandemic, it was not enough to ensure that #pint21 would be back live this May. Therefore for the second year, Pint of Science countries across the world facilitated online events to continue our mission of breaking down barriers to accessing science. Translating the events online was not without issues but as volunteers had taken the initiative to organise online events prior (check them out at #pintNLthuis!), the general organisation went smoother than expected. In addition, a bit different from other Pint of Science countries, the #pintNL team looked to host only one event per evening as to not overload the audience with sitting in front of a screen (especially after a full day of sitting behind a screen for work). To kick off the events, in the first week we had three cities present: Amsterdam, Nijmegen, and Maastricht. The topics were engaging with the audience and allowed to have open discussions about their research, ranging from love in times of COVID19 to how our gut may be the second brain in our bodies. As speakers were presenting from home, our Nijmegen event even had a glimpse of one of the speaker’s fully stocked bar at home! A nice COVID19 project and sure to inspire others to have their new ‘to-go’ bar for the future. The second week expanded the number of events with a different city hosting an event each night. Beginning from Groningen and making our way down to Eindhoven, each night captured the audience by with pondering topics such as the impact of microplastics to our health, the ethical use of animals in medical experiments and the ever increasing impact of robotics and AI in our daily lives. For the #pintNL team, it was nice to welcome the Leiden team this year and it was great to see them host their very first event! Not wanting to spoil all the magic behind the events, you can check them all out on our YouTube channel (here). So does what the future hold in store for the #pintNL team? Well first, a nice summer vacation is needed to relax and take a well deserved break from research, work, and volunteering. And what better way to relax than with upcoming blog posts from the #pintNL blog team! As to the upcoming year, With the vaccine roll out increasing, we aim to bring #pint22 back to the pubs (and we have a secret in store – more details to follow soon). Keep on the lookout for more details and hope to see you all live in the coming future! Warmest regards, Pint of Science Netherlands team

Herdenken, waar is het goed voor?

Herdenken, waar is het goed voor?

Het is 4 mei 2021. Samen met je man zit je achter de televisie om de nationale herdenking te volgen. Dat ben je nu eenmaal zo gewend, je ouders deden het ook altijd. Om 20:00 uur ben je, net als ongeveer 90% van de Nederlandse bevolking, 2 minuten stil. Je doet mee en voelt je verbonden met de mensen om je heen. Het raakt je om de persoonlijke verhalen van (klein)kinderen van oorlogsgetroffenen te horen, die vertellen wat hun familie in de oorlog heeft meegemaakt en welke impact dit op hen heeft. Het herinnert je aan alle verhalen die je eigen vader en moeder je vertelden. Verdriet en trots strijden om voorrang. Zo’n moment van herdenken inspireert je. Diezelfde nacht wordt je wakker door het schreeuwen van je man, die naast je ligt. Je hebt het al een tijd niet meer gehoord, maar nachtmerries lijken hem weer te overspoelen. Je man, die veteraan is, deed ook mee aan de nationale herdenking en was erg nerveus en gestrest na afloop. Zou dat de trigger zijn geweest? Het is een aantrekkelijke gedachte om te geloven dat herdenken mensen en de samenleving als geheel helpt om met verlies en traumatische ervaringen om te gaan. Maar de realiteit is dat we simpelweg nog niet goed weten wat nu daadwerkelijk de impact van herdenken is. En dat terwijl er zo vaak een herdenking georganiseerd wordt. Stille tochten, bloemenzeeën, nieuwe monumenten: Er gaat geen dag voorbij of er is wel iets over herdenken te lezen in het nieuws. In ons onderzoek richten we ons op de vraag wat een oorlogsherdenking emotioneel doet met mensen, wanneer en voor wie dit waardevol is. Dit is wat we ontdekten. Heftige ervaring Herdenken roept bij veel oorlogsgetrof­fenen directe herinneringen op aan wat zij hebben meegemaakt. Dat geldt niet alleen voor de ooggetuigen van de Tweede Wereldoorlog, maar ook voor mensen die andere oorlogen hebben meegemaakt zoals veteranen en vluchtelingen of kinderen van oorlogsgetroffenen. Daarmee is de herdenking voor sommigen een emotionele en heftige ervaring. In het bijzonder voor hen die psychische problemen ervaren door hun oorlogservaringen kan herdenken heel stressvol zijn. Klachten zoals nachtmerries, concentratieverlies of schrikreacties kunnen toenemen in de tijd rond een herdenking, al is dit in de meeste gevallen niet van blijvende aard. Emoties als verdriet, boosheid en wraakgevoelens kunnen worden aangewakkerd. Ook gevoelens van rouw en eenzaamheid spelen vaak op (1). Maar waarom herdenken wij dan, als het juist voor getroffenen zo'n heftige ervaring kan zijn? ‘Therapie’ voor getroffenen Er schuilt voor oorlogsgetroffenen ook een enorme kracht in collectief herdenken. De herdenking kan voor hen de vorm van een soort mini-therapie aannemen (2). Het is intrigerend om te zien dat in een herdenking allerlei elementen terugkomen die we kennen van traumagerichte therapie. Herdenken doet denken aan ‘exposure’ oftewel ‘gecontroleerde blootstelling’. In therapie wordt een patiënt door vragen of beelden blootgesteld aan het verleden en uitgedaagd in gedachten terug te keren naar traumatische gebeurtenissen. Als dit zoals in een behandelkamer in een veilige, gecontroleerde omgeving plaatsvindt, die afgebakend is in de tijd, kan een herinnering van zijn emotionele lading worden ontdaan. Net als tijdens een behandeling kan een herdenking iemand terugbrengen in het verleden en tegelijk zo’n veilige omgeving bieden, door de afgebakende tijdsspanne: de herdenking heeft een duidelijk begin en eind. Een veteraan, uitgezonden naar Irak, verwoordde het als volgt: “Tijdens de herdenking komen gevechtshandelingen naar boven, de spannende situaties en hoe het mis had kunnen gaan. Maar het is goed voor mij om stil te staan bij wat ik heb meegemaakt. Het fijne aan een herdenking vind ik dat het zo geclusterd is rond één tijd in het jaar. Hierdoor blijft het behapbaar, niet zo alomtegenwoordig.” Een ander element van een herdenking dat parallellen vertoont met traumatherapie is ‘emotieregulatie’. In plaats van overspoeld te worden door plotseling opkomende emoties, of deze juist altijd weg te drukken, leert men om een veelheid aan emoties te herkennen en te reguleren. Een herdenking biedt oorlogsgetroffenen de gelegenheid om emoties en gevoelens te uiten, zowel in woorden als in gedrag. Tranen, die op andere momenten niet begrepen worden of niet gewenst zijn, kunnen tijdens een herdenking wel gelaten worden. Een laatste element van herdenken dat herkenbaar is binnen traumatherapie is de ‘cognitieve herstructurering’: het veranderen van betekenis en gedachten die bij de traumatische herinnering horen. Een vluchteling uit voormalig Joegoslavië vertelde: “Herdenken biedt ruimte om even in contact te komen met mijn leed. Je voelt ook het leed van anderen en dan denk ik even: ik ben niet de enige.” De emoties die boven komen blijven voor haar niet zonder betekenis. Ze ziet de emoties op de gezichten van anderen, van ouderen die de Tweede Wereldoorlog hebben meegemaakt. De gedeelde emoties van verdriet en verlies verbinden haar met deze overlevenden. Deze verbondenheid wordt vaker genoemd. Herdenken brengt mensen – niet alleen fysiek, maar ook emotioneel – bij elkaar. En dat geldt niet alleen voor degenen die zelf oorlog hebben meegemaakt. Trots en inspiratie
Herdenken heeft niet alleen impact voor oorlogs­getroffenen. De meeste mensen die de Dodenherdenking in Nederland volgen hebben helemaal geen oorlogsherinneringen. Toch blijkt dat de Dodenherdenking vrijwel niemand onberoerd laat. Jong en oud, mensen met of zonder oorlogserva­ringen, met of zonder migratieachtergrond: allen reageren emotioneel op het zien van de Nationale Herdenking. Vrijwel iedereen ervaart verdriet, somberheid en enige angst of boosheid. Daar staat tegenover dat veel mensen naast het verdriet ook positieve emoties als trots en inspiratie ervaren. Al deze emoties bestaan tijdens een herdenking naast elkaar. Het geheim voor de positieve gevoelens: Erkenning en verbondenheid ervaren tijdens het herdenken, en betekenis kunnen geven aan de verschrikkingen van oorlog. Het neemt het verdriet niet weg maar plaatst naast het verdriet ook een positief gevoel. Wanneer mensen, met of zonder oorlogserva­ringen, door de herdenking in staat zijn om dat te ervaren heeft de herdenking waarde. Tot slot
Met ons onderzoek komen we iets dichter bij het antwoord op de vraag waar herdenken goed voor is. Het kan een bijdrage leveren in het omgaan met oorlogservaringen en een bron zijn van erkenning, verbinding en betekenisgeving. Hopelijk dragen de uitkomsten er uiteindelijk aan bij dat herdenken voor iedereen waardevol is. Bertine Mitima-Verloop Werkzaam bij: ARQ Nationaal Psychotrauma Centrum en verbonden aan Universiteit Utrecht, afdeling Klinische Psychologie Favoriete drankje: Vers sap, het liefst van zo veel mogelijk verschillende soorten fruit LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bertine-mitima-verloop-3a95b3a5/ Wil je meer weten? Vind meer over de uitkomsten van Bertine's onderzoek naar de impact van herdenken: https://www.4en5mei.nl/onderzoek/onderzoeken/rituelenonderzoek-constant-en-in-beweging Vind meer over Bertine en haar werk: https://www.uu.nl/medewerkers/HBMitimaVerloop https://oorlog.arq.org/nl/over-ons/medewerkers/bertine-mitima Verwijzingen 1. Mitima-Verloop, H.B., Boelen, P.A. & Mooren, T.T.M. (2020). Commemoration of disruptive events: a scoping review about posttraumatic stress reactions and related factors. European Journal of Psychotraumatology. https://doi.org/10.1080/20008198.2019.1701226 2. Dit gedeelte is gebaseerd op een eerder verschenen essay: De tweede minuut stilte (2020). Geschreven door Ilse Raaijmakers en Bertine Mitima-Verloop. Het essay is te downloaden via https://oorlog.arq.org/nl/beleidsonderzoek/publicaties/arq-essay-de-tweede-minuut-stilte

Geslacht, gender en gezondheid: hebben we dan niks geleerd van vroeger? (NL)

Geslacht, gender en gezondheid: hebben we dan niks geleerd van vroeger? (NL)

Ik hou ervan als ik in het dagelijks leven voorbeelden tegenkom die van toepassing zijn op mijn werk. Afgelopen week, bijvoorbeeld, hing ik met mijn 84-jarige oma aan de telefoon. Ze kon me niet zo goed verstaan. Toen ik haar uitlegde dat dat niet aan haar nieuwe gehoorapparaten lag, maar aan het feit dat mijn vriend aan het stofzuigen was, was ze verbaasd. Oma vond dat het mijn taak was om het huishouden te doen, ‘want, Aranka, jij bent toch de vrouw?’. Dit is een perfect voorbeeld van gender: de invulling van gedrag, identiteit en taken gebaseerd op de sociale normen en verwachtingen voor mannen en vrouwen. Hoe gender vormgegeven wordt, hangt af van tijd en plaats. M’n oma heeft het idee dat huishoudtaken door de vrouw moeten worden gedaan, gebaseerd op haar opvoeding in de jaren ’50. Ik heb daarentegen een heel ander idee over wie het huishouden doet (en nee, niet alleen omdat ik een hekel aan stofzuigen heb), maar mijn ideeën zijn vormgegeven door de huidige maatschappij. Dit is nog een onschuldig voorbeeld, maar de rol van gender in gezondheid heeft serieuze gevolgen hebben. In mijn onderzoek bekijk ik hoe gender en geslacht van invloed zijn op gezondheid. Ik probeer te begrijpen hoe gender en geslacht samenhangen met lichamelijke klachten en bijvoorbeeld de duur van deze klachten [1,2]. Maar, wat is precies het verschil tussen gender en geslacht? Gender is iemands ‘sociaal geslacht’, geslacht is biologisch. Geslacht omvat biologische kenmerken behorend bij het man- of vrouw zijn, waaronder genetica, hormonen en anatomie. Hoewel gender en geslacht samenhangen, zijn deze concepten zeker niet gelijk aan elkaar. Gender en geslacht beïnvloeden gezondheid en ziekte op hun eigen manier, en waarschijnlijk op meer manieren dan je aanvankelijk denkt! Geslacht en gezondheid
Het is niet meer dan logisch dat geslacht een impact heeft op gezondheid: in een mannenlichaam ontwikkelt zich geen baarmoederhalskanker, en een prostaatonderzoek uitvoeren bij een vrouw is ook niet aan te raden. Dat is niet meer dan gezond boerenverstand. Hoewel ik niet weet of het een urban myth is, maar een anekdote die rondgaat onder wetenschappers die geslacht en gender onderzoeken, is dat in de jaren ’70 van de vorige eeuw een pilotstudie is gestart, waarin de effectiviteit van een potentieel geneesmiddel voor baarmoederhalskanker werd onderzocht in mannen(!). Een beetje boerenverstand over geslacht had in dit geval geen kwaad gekund. Mijn onderzoek richt zich op de mate waarin geslacht invloed heeft op gezondheid, en of die invloed losstaat van gender. En daar is nog weinig over bekend! Uiteraard is de bewustwording voor geslacht en gender binnen de medische wetenschap toegenomen sinds de jaren ’70. Desondanks valt er nog heel wat te winnen op dit gebied. Een mooi initiatief is bijvoorbeeld Go Red For Women, waarbij mensen één dag zoveel mogelijk in het rood gekleed gaan om man/vrouw-verschillen in hart- en vaatziekten te benadrukken. En veel mensen weten inmiddels dat een vrouwenhart niet gelijk is aan een mannenhart. Maar toch, Google voor de lol maar eens op afbeeldingen met als thema ‘hartaanval’*. Er verschijnen een paar infographics over man/vrouw-verschillen in hart- en vaatziekten, maar de meeste afbeeldingen zijn van oudere mannen die naar hun hart grijpen. Klaarblijkelijk zijn er geen afbeeldingen van vrouwen die een hartaanval hebben, alsof vrouwen geen hartaanval kunnen krijgen?! *Sabine Oertelt-Prigione heeft mij een tijdje terug dit voorbeeld laten zien, maar m’n Google search van Maart 2021 laat zien dat het nog steeds relevant is En geslacht omvat meer dan alleen mannen- en vrouwenlichamen. Intersekse variaties, bijvoorbeeld, zijn onbekend bij 2 op de 3 Nederlanders en Vlamingen, maar hebben invloed op gezondheid [3]! Intersekse houdt in dat sommige lichamen niet voldoen aan het binaire idee van óf man óf vrouw. Er zijn bijvoorbeeld mensen die ‘ovotestes’ hebben. Dit betekent dat er zowel weefsel van mannelijke geslachtsorganen (testikels) als van vrouwelijke geslachtsorganen (eierstokken) aanwezig is in het lichaam. Dit betekent ook dat deze mensen aandoeningen aan beide soorten weefsels kunnen ontwikkelen. Intersekse variaties en de implicaties hiervan voor gezondheid zijn onwijs interessant, maar er is zoveel over te vertellen dat ze een eigen blog verdienen! Desalniettemin is het goed om te beseffen dat er meer is dan sec mannen- en vrouwenlichamen: een lichaam is niet per sé óf mannelijk, óf vrouwelijk, maar kan ook een combinatie zijn. Gender en gezondheid
Hoe zit dat dan met gender en gezondheid? Gender beïnvloedt gezondheid op meerdere manieren. Zo heeft het effect op het ondernemen van risicovol gedrag. Als je een keer hard wil lachen, lees dan vooral dit artikel: “The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behavior” [4]. Met een knipoog wordt hierin uitgelegd dat mannelijk gender associeert met idioot gedrag (#SorryNotSorry, mannen…). Men zag de invloed van gender ook duidelijk terug in de Ebola epidemie in West-Afrika in 2014. Lokale tradities en gebruiken schrijven voor dat vrouwen de zieken en gestorvenen horen te verzorgen. Hierdoor waren het ook voornamelijk vrouwen die in aanraking kwamen met besmettelijke lichamen, en dus met het Ebola virus [5]. Terug in de tijd…
Ons huidige denken over de gezondheidszorg in relatie tot geslacht en gender is gevormd door de tijd heen. We kunnen niet ontkennen dat gedurende lange tijd vrouwenlichamen inferieur werden geacht ten opzichte van mannenlichamen. Vroeger werden vrouwen en hun lichamen gezien als ‘broedmachines’, met als enig doel het baren van kinderen [6]. Het idee dat mannen en vrouwen slechts verschilden in hun geslachtsorganen zorgde er ook voor dat alleen vrouwelijke geslachtsorganen bestudeerd hoefde te worden. Immers, al het andere kon bestudeerd worden in mannenlichamen, de ‘standaardlichamen’, toch? De focus op vrouwelijke geslachtsorganen was reeds aanwezig tijdens de Griekse Oudheid. Griekse filosofen en artsen zoals Plato en Hippocrates stelden dat de baarmoeder verantwoordelijk was voor lichamelijke en psychische klachten in vrouwen. Want, je wist het waarschijnlijk nog niet, maar de baarmoeder kon namelijk aan de wandel gaan (“a wandering womb”). Ja, je leest het goed: de baarmoeder kan zwerven in een lichaam. En wij maar denken dat de baarmoeder in de buikholte gefixeerd zit… Nee, beste lezer, omhoog, omlaag, links, rechts: de richting waarin de baarmoeder zich bewoog was gelinkt aan de klachten die een vrouw ervaarde. Wanneer de baarmoeder zich bijvoorbeeld omhoog bewoog zorgde dit voor hoofdpijn. In alle eerlijkheid, als mijn baarmoeder zich ergens in m’n borstkas zou bevinden, zou ik denk ik wel iets anders dan alleen hoofdpijn hebben, maar dat terzijde. Ook gedurende de Middeleeuwen bestond het idee van de wandelende baarmoeder nog: de baarmoeder wandelde rond door het lichaam om een kind te zoeken. Tijdens de 17e en 18e eeuw was het idee van de vrouw als ‘broedmachine’ nog steeds aanwezig. Vroege anatomische schetsen uit die tijd laten zien dat vrouwelijke skeletten expres werden afgebeeld met wijdere bekken (ofwel, genoeg ruimte om een kind te laten passeren) en met kleinere schedels dan mannelijke skeletten (ofwel, vrouwen waren lang niet zo slim als mannen). En nog steeds werd de baarmoeder gezien als de oorzaak voor álle klachten die een vrouw ervaarde. Een goed voorbeeld is de paraplu-diagnose ‘hysterie’. Symptomen van hysterie waren kortademigheid, duizeligheid, prikkelbaarheid, verminderd libido, maar gek genoeg ook een verhoogd libido, en enige vorm van rebellie (lees: feminisme) – kortom, hysterie was een diagnose gegeven aan ‘moeilijke vrouwen’. Feitelijk was hysterie iets voor vrouwen die een mening hadden die niet strookte met de toenmalige tijdsgeest. Behandelingen voor hysterie focusten zich ook op de baarmoeder, variërend van het masseren van de baarmoeder, tot het (gedwongen) verwijderen ervan. Pas in 1980 is hysterie als diagnose uit de psychiatrische handboeken verwijderd. Al met al, gebaseerd op geslacht (de baarmoeder), en gender (ongewenst feministisch gedachtegoed erop na houden) werden vrouwen vroeger gediagnosticeerd met hysterie. Hoe nu verder?
Om terug te komen op de vraag in de titel: hebben we dan niks geleerd van vroeger wanneer het gaat om gender en geslacht? Ik denk het wel. Langzaam maar zeker krijgen geslacht en gender voet aan de grond in onderzoeksland. Mijn promotieonderzoek is daar slechts één voorbeeld van. Wij hebben bijvoorbeeld een methode ontwikkeld om gender te kwantificeren in cohort studies, zodat onderzoekers reeds verzamelde data in verband met gender kunnen brengen. We bedenken ook hoe we netjes en informatief naar iemands geslacht, inclusief intersekse variaties, en genderidentiteit kunnen vragen, zodat dit in toekomstige studies meegenomen kan worden. En, het mooie is, dat er nog veel meer onderzoek naar geslacht, gender en gezondheid gaande is. We staan pas aan het begin! Dus… To be continued! Aranka Viviënne Ballering Universiteit: Rijksuniversiteit Groningen/Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen Onderzoeksprogramma: Interdisciplinary Center for Psychopathology and Emotion regulation (ICPE). Favoriete drankje: Normaal thee, maar op een hete zomerdag zeg ik geen nee tegen een Piña Colada 😊 Vind Aranka op Social media: Twitter: @ArankaVivienne @SymptomenGender LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aranka-ballering/ Wil je meer weten? Ga naar https://www.rug.nl/staff/a.v.ballering/research voor Aranka's persoonlijke onderzoeksprofiel en onderzoeksartikelen. Voor meer informatie over het multidisciplinaire onderzoek naar gender- en geslachtsverschillen is het zeker de moeite waard om de volgende website te bezoeken: https://symptomengender.ruhosting.nl/. Referenties [1] Ballering, AV., Bonvanie, IJ., Olde Hartman, TC., Monden, R., Rosmalen, JGM. (2020). Gender and sex independently associate with common somatic symptoms and lifetime prevalence of chronic disease. Social Science & Medicine, 253, 112968. [2] Ballering, AV., Wardenaar, KJ., Olde Hartman, TC., Rosmalen, JGM. (2020). Female sex and femininity independently associate with common somatic symptom trajectories.Psychological Medicine, 1-11. doi:10.1017/S0033291720004043 [3] Rutgers. (2021) Slechts 1 op 3 van de Nederlanders en Vlamingen weet wat intersekse is. Retrieved from: https://www.rutgers.nl/nieuws-opinie/nieuwsarchief/slechts-1-op-3-van-de-nederlanders-en-vlamingen-weet-wat-intersekse [4] Lendrem, BAD., Lendrem, DW., Gray, A., Isaacs, JD. (2014). The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ Lendrem, B. A. D., Lendrem, D. W., Gray, A., & Isaacs, J. D. (2014). The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ, 349, doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g7094. [5] Ballering, AV. (2020). Corona: verschillende gevolgen voor mannen en vrouwen? Retrieved from: https://symptomengender.ruhosting.nl/blogg-22-bezonnen-lezingen-over-gender-gezondheid/#more-995 [6] Jackson, G. (2019). The female problem: how male bias in medical trials ruined women’s health. Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/nov/13/the-female-problem-male-bias-in-medical-trials

Sex, gender and health: is history repeating itself? (EN)

Sex, gender and health: is history repeating itself? (EN)

I like it when my personal life provides me with perfect examples to use in my working life. Last week, I had a discussion with my 84-year-old grandma on the phone. She couldn’t hear me very well, as my boyfriend was vacuuming. After I explained where the noise came from, she was surprised. She figured it was my job, as a woman, to do household chores. This is a perfect example of gender: the socially prescribed and experienced behaviors, roles and identities of people, based on them being male or female. Gender is shaped over time and place, thus it is only natural my view in this differs from my grandma’s view. Although this is an innocent example, the influence of gender on one’s health is much more serious! In my PhD research I explore how gender and sex may influence our health: I seek to understand to what extent sex and gender associate with, for example, the severity andlongevity of common somatic symptoms [1,2]. But how does gender exactly differ from sex? Well, you could think of gender as the psychosocial equivalent of biological sex. Sex refers to biological characteristics, including but not limited to genes, hormones and anatomy of male and female bodies. Gender is a socially constructed concept, sex is a biological concept. Gender and sex are definitely not the same, but both affect people’s health, in more ways than you initially may think. Sex and disease
Why do we even look into sex and gender and their relation with health? We are all well aware of the impact sex has on health. Sure, males won’t develop ovarian or cervical cancer and females don’t need a prostate exam. That’s just common sense, right? Although I’m not sure it’s an urban myth, but among sex and gender researcher the anecdote of a 1970s pilot study investigating a potential treatment for cervical cancer in a completely male (!) study sample is often told. I like to think these investigators had common sense too. I hear you thinking: ‘In the meantime, 50 years has passed. It must have changed by now right?’. Off course progress had been made. For example, Go Red For Women is an initiative that raises awareness for heart conditions in females by asking people to wear red one day a year. Many people are nowadays aware that female heart symptoms differ from male heart symptoms. Nevertheless, if you Google ‘heart attack’ images, some infographics about sex differences in heart attacks pop up, but most pictures are males clamping their chest. Apparently there’re no stock photos of women suffering from a heart attack, as if women are not affected by heart attacks?* *Sabine Oertelt-Prigione showed me this example some time ago, but my Google search of March 2021 shows that it’s still true! Additionally, there’s more to sex than just male or female bodies. For example, intersex variations are unknown to two-thirds of the Dutch and Flemmish people [3]. Intersex variations comprise bodies that deviate from the binary male and female idea. For instance, some people may have what we call ovotestes. This means that both ovarian and testicular tissue is present in one individual. Consequently, people with ovotestes may develop malignancies in both these types of tissues. Although intersex variations and their implications for health are wildly interesting, there’s so much to discuss that these deserve a blog on their own. Nevertheless, it is good to realize that there’s more to sex than just male and female bodies and that this affects health. Gender and disease
What about gender? Gender influences health in many ways: it is thought that gender influences risk-taking behavior. If you want to have a good laugh, please read the BMJ Christmas article on gender and risk-taking behavior “The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behavior”, #SorryNotSorry guys [4]. Gender also associates with the prevalence of disease: thinking back of the 2014 Ebola epidemic in Western Africa, it were predominantly women who taking care of the ill and the deceased, who remained contagious after death. This exposed more women to the virus than men [5]. Back in the days…
History has undoubtedly shaped our current healthcare philosophy with regards to sex and gender. We can’t deny that historically female bodies were considered inferior to male bodies. Through history, female bodies were often seen as nothing more than reproductive machinery [6]. The idea that women and men merely differed in their reproductive organs made studying anything other than female reproductive organs in women unnecessary. After all, everything else could be studied in men, right? This strong focus on female reproductive organs was already present during the Greek era. Greek physicians and philosophers such as Hippocrates and Plato figured that it was the uterus, which has no male equivalent, that was the ‘fault’ for conditions that affected women. You see, sometime the uterus could wander (silly reader, all this time you were thinking a uterus was fixed in the female’s lower abdomen, right?) But no, dear reader… Up, down, left and right: the direction in which the uterus wandered, was linked to specific diseases according to the Greeks. Up, for example, caused headaches. In all honesty, if my uterus just wandered into my torso somewhere near my heart, I think I would have more to worry about than just headaches... In the Middle Ages the idea of the wandering uterus was still prevalent: the uterus wandered through the body in search of a child. Among medical scientists during the 17th and 18th century the common idea was that female bodies’ function was childbearing. Early anatomical sketches of skeletons intentionally depicted females’ hips wider (i.e. suitable for childbearing) and their craniums smaller (i.e. not as smart as men). Up until the 19th century, the uterus was to blame for female-specific complaints, and even for complaints that weren’t linked to the female bodies. Basically, the uterus was to blame for anything and everything a woman experienced. A great example of that time is the catch-all diagnosis of hysteria in women. Symptoms of hysteria were shortness of breath, fainting, irritability, a decreased libido, but funnily enough also an increased libido and any kind of rebellion (but truly feminism) – in short, hysteria was associated with ‘difficult women’. I think, in this day and age we can state that women with an opinion were diagnosed with hysteria. Treatments for hysteria focused on the womb: from massaging it, to hysterectomies. Hysteria was only removed from the DSM, the diagnostic manual of mental disorders, in 1980. Thus, based on their sex (female reproductive organs) and gender (taking a feminist rebellious approach to gender roles) women were diagnosed with hysteria in the past. So… Now what?
Circling back to the question asked at the beginning: is history repeating itself when it comes to sex, gender and health? I’d like to say that the tide is changing. My PhD research is just one example of increased awareness about sex and gender in medicine and research: we developed a novel method to assess gender roles in cohort studies, facilitating gender-related research in studies that did not originally include a gender measure in their studies. We are also thinking about how to include items in questionnaires that are informative and sensitive when asking for participants’ sex (including intersex variations). And we’re just starting: much more research exploring sex, gender and health is done around the globe. Thus… To be continued! Aranka Viviënne Ballering University: University of Groningen/University Medical Center Groningen Research programme: Interdisciplinary Center for Psychopathology and Emotion regulation (ICPE). Favorite drink: Usually tea, but I won’t turn down a Piña Colada on a hot summer day 😊 Find Aranka on Social media: Twitter: @ArankaVivienne @SymptomenGender LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aranka-ballering/ Do you want to know more? Check out https://www.rug.nl/staff/a.v.ballering/research for Aranka's personal profile and research articles. You can also find more information on the multidisciplinary research on sex- and genderdifferences on the following website: https://symptomengender.ruhosting.nl/. References [1] Ballering, AV., Bonvanie, IJ., Olde Hartman, TC., Monden, R., Rosmalen, JGM. (2020). Gender and sex independently associate with common somatic symptoms and lifetime prevalence of chronic disease. Social Science & Medicine, 253, 112968. [2] Ballering, AV., Wardenaar, KJ., Olde Hartman, TC., Rosmalen, JGM. (2020). Female sex and femininity independently associate with common somatic symptom trajectories.Psychological Medicine, 1-11. doi:10.1017/S0033291720004043 [3] Rutgers. (2021) Slechts 1 op 3 van de Nederlanders en Vlamingen weet wat intersekse is. Retrieved from: https://www.rutgers.nl/nieuws-opinie/nieuwsarchief/slechts-1-op-3-van-de-nederlanders-en-vlamingen-weet-wat-intersekse [4] Lendrem, BAD., Lendrem, DW., Gray, A., Isaacs, JD. (2014). The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ Lendrem, B. A. D., Lendrem, D. W., Gray, A., & Isaacs, J. D. (2014). The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ, 349, doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g7094. [5] Ballering, AV. (2020). Corona: verschillende gevolgen voor mannen en vrouwen? Retrieved from: https://symptomengender.ruhosting.nl/blogg-22-bezonnen-lezingen-over-gender-gezondheid/#more-995 [6] Jackson, G. (2019). The female problem: how male bias in medical trials ruined women’s health. Retrieved from: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/nov/13/the-female-problem-male-bias-in-medical-trials

Brain Awareness Week: How to take good care of your brain

Brain Awareness Week: How to take good care of your brain

You’re probably quite aware that you have a brain. But are you really? A lot of the amazing work this energy-consuming organ is doing is often taken for granted. Everything from walking and talking to planning tasks and solving complex puzzles is orchestrated by the brain. So we’d better take good care of it. In the context of Brain Awareness Week, I will share with you some tips for cherishing this valuable pudding in your skull. Protect your brain The brain looks like a watery, jelly-like pudding. Without the protection from the skull, it would easily be damaged. But even with the skull, a hard blow to the head can have serious consequences. The problem with brain damage is that it is very difficult to repair. The recovery time from a concussion can take up to three months, while for more severe injuries to the head this can take much longer and some damage can even be permanent. Moderate and severe brain injury has even been linked to a higher risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia. In addition, frequent mild injuries from contact sports, such as boxing, soccer or American football have been linked to the above diseases [1]. It is therefore very important to protect your brain with a helmet when you’re doing sports at high speeds or playing contact sports. Use your brain Even though the brain does not make a lot of new cells, what its master at is generating new connections between brain cells. This is what makes our brains so good at learning new things, especially at a young age. When connections are used often they grow stronger, and when you learn or experience something new, new connections are made. Having a lot of connections builds a kind of ‘cognitive reserve’. It is therefore recommended to keep challenging your brain, no matter how young or old you are. The best way to challenge your brain is by doing things that are not automatic or standard. Walking a different route to work for instance can already help to form new connections between brain cells. Other brain training activities are learning a new language, playing an instrument, solving puzzles, playing games, or even reading a nice book [2]. Exercise your brain (and body) When we exercise, we often do this in order to stay fit and have a healthy body. But regular exercise is also very good for our brain and mental health. Research has shown that physical exercise can reduce symptoms of depression or ADHD, reduce the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, and improve sleep and cognitive functions such as memory [3]. However, it is difficult to exactly pin-point what type of exercise, for how long, and in what conditions exercise is most effective. There have been research studies that found no positive (or negative) effects of physical exercise. Still, it is generally recommended to for instance take a walk each day. To encourage people, the Dutch Hersenstichting recently released an app called Ommetje. With each walk you earn points, and you can read about interesting brain facts from Neuropsychologist professor Erik Scherder. Feed your brain Next to exercise, a healthy diet is also key to a healthy brain. Not only does your brain consume 20% of your body’s total energy, it also needs a lot of different nutrients to work properly. For instance, the brain’s signalling molecules (called neurotransmitters) are made from amino acids that are obtained from food. Dopamine for example is made from the amino acid phenylalanine, which is present in most protein-containing foods. The bacteria that live in your gut play an important role in this, as they are needed to digest the food you eat. For instance, certain bacteria are needed to digest complex fibres, which they convert into short-chain fatty acids, essential substances for your body and brain. A healthy diet consists of fruits, vegetables, legumes (e.g., lentils and beans), nuts and whole grains [4]. Saturated fats and trans-fats (i.e., from animal products and processed foods) and sugars should be limited. The Mediterranean diet is considered as a good example of a healthy diet. Of course, smoking, alcohol and drugs are not beneficial for brain health (although a very moderate consumption of alcohol is part of the Mediterranean diet). Rest your brain After all those puzzles, exercise and eating, it’s time to give your brain some rest. Sleep is important for your brain to process everything that has happened during the day. It is thought that the new connections, that I mentioned above, are mainly formed while you’re sleeping. If you don’t sleep (enough), your brain can’t properly process what you learned, and is less able to receive new input [5]. That’s why pulling an all-nighter while studying for a test is a bad idea. You can better get a good night’s sleep and let your brain do the work for you. This will not only boost your cognitive performance the next day, but you’re also more likely to remember what you learned for a longer period of time. Poor sleep has also been linked to poor mental health such as depression and ADHD. This blog was written by Jeanette Mostert. Jeanette obtained her PhD at the Radboud University Nijmegen on the topic of brain connectivity and cognitive differences in adults with ADHD. She now works as dissemination manager for several EU-funded research projects, where she works closely together with patient representatives and researchers, trying to reduce the gap between them. One example of her efforts is the website www.newbrainnutrition.com that shares information about lifestyle and mental health. She is also the communications officer for Pint of Science Netherlands. Further reading / sources 1. Traumatic brain injury & Alzheimer’s disease: https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia/related_conditions/traumatic-brain-injury (accessed 12 March 2021) 2. Training for brain health (in Dutch): https://www.hersenstichting.nl/dit-doen-wij/voorlichting/gezonde-hersenen/training/ (accessed 12 March 2021) 3. Biddle et al. (2016) Physical activity and mental health: evidence is growing. World Psychiatry 15(2): 176–177: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4911759/ 4. WHO healthy diet: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/healthy-diet (accessed 12 March 2021) 5. Sleep and brain health: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/the-science-of-sleep-understanding-what-happens-when-you-sleep (accessed 12 March 2021)